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BODY COUNT
by P.D. Martin
Mira Books, December 2007
400 pages
3.38 GBP
ISBN: 0778325210


Buy in the UK | Buy in Canada

Sophie Anderson used to be a cop. That was a lifetime all of eight months ago in her home country, Australia. Now she is an FBI profiler, having been lured from Victoria when she took a course given by an FBI agent.

Sophie has been plagued by nightmares for many years, since she was a small child, in fact, days before her young brother, John, was kidnapped and murdered. Her dream was prescient but did not permit her, given her youth and ignorance, to do anything to help him.

Now living and working in DC, Sophie has been a major player in trapping a killer. That assignment completed, Sophie, her beautiful, extroverted friend Sam Wright and Agent Josh Marco, who exerts a powerful attraction on Sophie, are made part of a team investigating a serial killer whose activities eventually become identified in several states.

Sophie has dreams containing tantalising bits of information about the murders but of course (well, what would happen to the surprise?) she is unable to see the killer's face. Then a friend is taken and Sophie feels she is working against time to find her friend.

This is a promising little tale. The ingenious author has managed to get the best of both worlds. If she wrote about the FBI with an American protagonist, she would fall into the same trap currently occupied by writers such as Elizabeth George and Caroline Carver: her work would, despite research, lack authenticity. By having a transplanted Australian as heroine, any gaps in knowledge are understandable. I do have one criticism, something that came up repeatedly throughout the text which made me shudder each time, especially since it could have been overcome by a good proofreader. Martin has obviously never been taught the correct use of nominative and accusative cases. Most of the time she employs the nominative incorrectly when the accusative is called for.

If a prospective reader should shy away at the thought of psychic overtones throughout the work, rest assured that this aspect is not overdone. The plotting and action is excellent and I, for one, didn't spot the baddie.

Reviewed by Denise Pickles, December 2007

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Contact: Yvonne Klein (ymk@reviewingtheevidence.com)


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